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Ethiopian Love Restaurant


Voted Honolulu's Best Ethopian Restaurant

(808) 725-7197 / Reservations

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Ethiopian Love Restaurant


Voted Honolulu's Best Ethopian Restaurant

(808) 725-7197 / Reservations

Ethiopian Love Restaurant

Hello Inspired Diners, Pleasure to meet you.

Welcome to DINING WITH PRESENCE

Did you know that an Ethiopian meal is served on a round of injera and shared by everyone at the table?  Injera is a sour flatbread made from Teff, a tiny, round grain that flourishes in the highlands of Ethiopia.  

Got GURSHA?

In Ethiopian, "GURSHA" is a big part of enjoying the meal. Gursha is a traditional practice observed at the dining table where seated together, a parent (typically the father) lovingly feeds first his wife, then his children "two rounds" of food. A significance to note, as one feeding is never enough to solidify this affectionate practice; hence "two rounds" of food serving to each family member.

 

Authentic Experience

Unique place and flavorful food, especially if you like vegetables!  Worth experiencing at least once,

Perfect Ambiance

Great place for impressing a date and getting intimate by eating with your hands

BYOB

It's BYOB but there is a liquor store a couple blocks away.

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Coffee Ceremony


The coffee ceremony is one of the most recognizable parts of Ethiopian culture. Coffee is offered when visiting friends, during festivities, or as a daily staple of life. If coffee is politely declined then most likely tea (shai) will be served.

Coffee Ceremony


The coffee ceremony is one of the most recognizable parts of Ethiopian culture. Coffee is offered when visiting friends, during festivities, or as a daily staple of life. If coffee is politely declined then most likely tea (shai) will be served.

Brewing

The coffee is brewed by first roasting the green coffee beans over hot coals in a brazier. Once the beans are roasted each participant is given an opportunity to sample the aromatic smoke by wafting it towards them. This is followed by the grinding of the beans, traditionally in a wooden mortar and pestle. The coffee grounds are then put into a special vessel and boiled. The boiling pot (jebena) is usually made of pottery and has a spherical base, a neck and pouring spout, and a handle where the neck connects with the base. When the coffee boils up through the neck it is poured in and out of another container to cool it, and then is put back into the boiling pot until it happens again. To pour the coffee from the boiling pot, a filter made from horsehair or other material is placed in the spout of the boiling pot to prevent the grounds from escaping.

Serving

An Eritrean woman pouring traditionally brewed coffee into finjalfrom a jebena.

The host pours the coffee for all participants by moving the tilted boiling pot over a tray with small, handleless cups without stop until each cup is full. Some of the coffee will inevitably miss the cup but this is done to prevent the coffee grounds from contaminating the brew. One extra cup is poured each time. The grounds are brewed three times: the first round of coffee is called awel in Tigrinya, the second kale'i and the third bereka ('to be blessed'). The coffee ceremony may also include burning of various traditional incense such as frankincense or gum arabic. People add sugar to their coffee, or in the countryside, sometimes salt and/or traditional butter.

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Flavors


Every plate achieves that elusive, cuisine-defining balance of sweet, salty, and sour — even dessert.

Flavors


Every plate achieves that elusive, cuisine-defining balance of sweet, salty, and sour — even dessert.

BERBERE

Berbere is a key ingredient in Ethiopian cuisine, made up of all sorts of tasty spices like ginger, garlic, red pepper, cardamom, cumin and fenugreek.  Also essential is Kebe, a clarified butter infused with ginger, garlic, and several spices.

MITMITA

Mitmita is a powdered seasoning mix used in Ethiopian cuisine. It is orange-red in color and contains ground birdseye chili peppers, cardamom seed, cloves and salt. It occasionally has other spices including cinnamon and ginger.

Injera/teff

Injera is a sourdough-risen flatbread with a unique, spongy texture traditionally made from TEFF flour. The fermentation process of making injera takes about 24-72 hours, resulting in a living-food that fortifies and is optimal for supporting digestive wellness.